Price of convenience…

The search for more convenience

Technology has allowed us to be more productive in our workplace (some might debate this) and also frees us up from many of the daily household chores. As a society we continue to search for convenience and invent ways to do less physical work and free up our time for recreation. Some of the new gadgets and devices are amazing at what they can do and really do provide great service for our lives. However, has this come at a price for our health and wellbeing?

Cost of convenience

There are fewer labour intensive jobs these days, which means most jobs are sedentary. This has resulted in many health issues in society, such as obesity, lower back pain and mobility issues. We are seeing improvements in the workplace such as stand up desks and the realisation that you need to regularly get up from your desk.

In the home, many daily chores have either been outsourced to other people or new technology devices. This has resulted in less personal movement in the day to day running of the house that was a natural part of our parents or grandparents lives. We look for easy and convenient options for preparing food, rather than learning to cook simple healthy meals. The price of this convenience as a society is a reduction in our health and wellbeing.

So what can we do about this problem?

Strategies for better health without giving up the gadgets

It is important then that the free time you have gained is used wisely by being active consistently. Sitting or lying around for 90% of your time and then going for a 30 minute workout is probably not the best strategy. One strategy might be to not outsource all tasks. For example, start washing your own car instead of getting it done down the road. Do your own vacuuming whilst listening to your favourite music.

Here are just a few more ideas that you could start implementing easily:

  • Park a few hundred metres away from the shops so you walk further
  • Use the stairs rather than the lift
  • Buy a cookbook that has 30 easy to cook meals that won’t break the budget (cheaper than eating out)
  • Pick a few household chores (that you don’t mind) to do yourself rather outsourcing
  • Use your free time to enjoy active leisure (bike rides, walks or yoga)

There are many other strategies that I’m sure you can come up with to improve your health and wellbeing. You don’t have to make massive sweeping changes, but small incremental improvements over several months will help you on your road to better health.